A history and use of electromagnetics

Electromagnets are created by having an iron core wound with a conductor carrying current. The strength of the electromagnet depends upon the amount of current passing through the conductor. Also the current can be easily stopped and started to form an electromagnet and de-energize respectively as per the need of the work to be performed.

A history and use of electromagnetics

The Electromagnet The electromagnet developed from a series of observations. In Hans Christian Oersted discovered that a current-carrying wire set up a magnetic field. Finally, William Sturgeon found that leaving the iron inside the coil greatly increased the resulting magnetic field.

A history and use of electromagnetics

Sturgeon also bent the iron core into a U-shape to bring the poles closer together, thus concentrating the magnetic field lines. Sturgeon insulated the iron and wound bare wire on it, but Joseph Henry took the final step of insulating the wire. His largest electromagnet, built incould lift pounds One of his original electromagnets is in the Smithsonian Institution collection.

The unsigned electromagnet at the right is at Washington and Jefferson College. This is an electromagnet with three poles! The two halves of the winding are continuous, but are in opposite directions.

Thus, the poles have the arrangement North-South and South-North, resulting in North poles on the ends and a South pole at the center. Moving a compass slowly along the length reveals the presence of the three poles; garlands of iron filings will loop from each end to the middle.

I do not know who developed this demonstration, but the earliest record of it I have seen in the edition of Daniel Davis's Manual of Magnetism.

Here are two electromagnets of very different size. When equipped with a secondary winding, this was the world's first Induction Coil. On the right is a mystery piece of apparatus from Vassar College with a wooden base clearly made by Ritchie of Boston.

While it may be just an electromagnet, it could be the lower half of Froment's Motor. This horizontal helix on a stand was probably made by Daniel Davis or one of his successors at some time after ca.

The hollow coil produces a magnetic field that is enhanced when an iron bar is placed inside. The helix is in the Greenslade Collection. This electromagnet follows the tradition of having the current-carrying coils painted dark green; permanent magnets were invariably painted red.Electromagnetism is an area of physics which involves the study of the electromagnetic force, a type of physical interaction that occurs between electrically charged particles.

The electromagnetic force usually produces electromagnetic fields, such as electric fields, magnetic fields and.

Applications of Electromagnetism

What Are The Uses Of Electromagnets? History of Electromagnets: This was to have a popularizing effect on the use of electromagnets. Electromagnetism: Electromagnetism, science of charge and of the forces and fields associated with charge.

Electricity and magnetism are two aspects of electromagnetism. Electricity and magnetism were long thought to be separate forces. It was not until the 19th century that they were finally treated as interrelated. Electromagnetics History, Theory, and Applications A usefulreference for engineers and physicists, the IEEE reprinting of thisclassic text provides a deep, fundamental understanding ofelectromagnetics.

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The electromagnet at the right was made by John Millington when he was the Professor of Chemistry, Natural Philosophy and Engineering at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. On the bottom is written his name, the .

Electromagnetism, science of charge and of the forces and fields associated with charge.

Fundamentals

Electricity and magnetism are two aspects of electromagnetism. Electricity and magnetism were long thought to be separate forces.

It was not until the 19th century that they were finally treated as interrelated phenomena.

Uses or Simple Applications of Electromagnetism in Technology and Life